Posts Tagged ‘ Children of the Global Village ’

Nevada, South Carolina, Prairies vs Rest of Canada, Communist Manifesto and Great Canadian boom of the 1850s

Feb 21st, 2016 | By | Category: In Brief

GANATSEKWYAGON, ON. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 20 / SUNDAY FEBRUARY 21, 2016 : Watching MSNBC on US TV, from the northwest shore of Lake Ontario, you can almost feel various more rational and realistic strands of Democracy in America breathing easier after Hillary Clinton’s strong enough edging of Bernie Sanders (53%–47% finally?) in the Nevada Democratic Caucus. […]



The beginnings of various regional democracies in what is now Canada, after the War of 1812

Aug 21st, 2015 | By | Category: Heritage Now

The establishment of several regional political cultures of united empire loyalism was one thing going on in the second British North America during the first half of the 19th century. Something of this old imperial and monarchist ideology still has traction in some parts of Canada today. Yet it is no longer at any centre […]



Ontario’s flag flap 2015 .. and its own burden of history from just before (and after) the War of 1812

Jun 22nd, 2015 | By | Category: In Brief

Questions have been raised about the Confederate flag still flying over the South Carolina state capitol, even after the appalling terrorist prayer-meeting murders in Charleston this past Wednesday night. They may remind some of us north of the Great Lakes that a few much milder questions were raised about the current Ontario provincial flag last […]



Canada — peacemaker or powder monkey today .. and three 18th century wars that made two countries

May 16th, 2015 | By | Category: In Brief

Freeman Dyson’s recent interesting note on Albert Einstein and the old  “dualistic philosophy” of quantum mechanics — masquerading as a New York review of Stephen Gimbel’s Einstein: His Space and Times — has also made some of us think about what ought to be another big issue in this year’s Canadian federal election. (Believe it […]



Harold Innis’s case for Canadian Senate reform in the 1940s

Apr 10th, 2015 | By | Category: Key Current Issues

The ongoing trial of suspended Canadian Senator Mike Duffy has reminded some of us that back in the late spring of 2013 Randall White posted a note on this site about Harold Innis’s “more or less random observations on the Senate, and the related issue of Canadian regionalism”  — which, taken together, “add up to […]



English-speaking Canada before 1763

Apr 10th, 2015 | By | Category: Heritage Now

Canadian history would be easier to digest if its main story-line was just that the French and Indians began the modern country in the 17th and first half of the 18th centuries, and then the British monarchy and its rising global empire took it over at the 1759 Battle of the Plains of Abraham, as […]



Anti-petroleum, Justin Trudeau, Louis Riel, and First Quest for the Northwest

Feb 20th, 2015 | By | Category: In Brief

You know you are living in strange times when you read headlines like “‘Anti-petroleum’ movement a growing security threat to Canada, RCMP say.” Really? Our lives and property are at risk from an “anti-petroleum” movement? Is Franz Kafka working for the RCMP now? Will we soon have crimes like anti-petroleum activities? Will purchasing a Tesla […]



France in Canada‘s past — and its own future in the 21st century ..

Jan 10th, 2015 | By | Category: In Brief

We are glad to hear that the French flag has been “flying outside Toronto’s city hall … in solidarity with the people of France.” And we were pleased to read about how “Toronto’s French community gathers for Charlie Hebdo vigil … Facebook group summons demonstrators to consulate Wednesday to declare ‘Je suis Charlie’ after massacre […]



France in America and the first people who called themselves Canadians

Jan 10th, 2015 | By | Category: Heritage Now

Modern Canada begins with contact between North American aboriginal or first nations peoples and seaborne Europeans in the 16th century. (There was earlier contact of this sort, more than a half century before the 1066 Norman Conquest in England — as described by Plate 16 in the 1987 first volume of the Historical Atlas of […]



Is Stephen Harper really making a good case for another crowning, as we try to remember Giovanni Caboto in 1497 ??

Nov 20th, 2014 | By | Category: In Brief

Lawrence Martin’s quite remarkable Globe and Mail column this past Tuesday (November 18, 2014)  — “A pro-active PM seizes the agenda” — deserves more attention, and debate. The essential argument is nicely (or otherwise) summarized in Mr. Martin’s first paragraph : “If victory goes to the guy who wants it most, Stephen Harper is making […]