Archive for March 2011

Will still more bad opposition polls kill Canadian spring election in the end?

Mar 11th, 2011 | By | Category: In Brief

As the week of March 7–11 that maybe was or was not in Canadian federal politics closes, two new polls on party standings have thrown some almost abrupt cold water on the more or less enthused speculation about such themes as “can opposition get Harper on abuse of power instead of budget?” — that I […]



The Canadian federal election of 2011 : can opposition get Harper on abuse of power instead of budget?

Mar 9th, 2011 | By | Category: In Brief

[UPDATED MARCH 9, 8 PM ET]. Yesterday the two oldest Toronto newspapers threw a little red meat to those who long for the demise of the “Harper government” in Ottawa (with some milder parallel reporting in the rest of the country). In the Globe and Mail Lawrence Martin’s column, “On the road to the Harper […]



Streetcar named Rob Ford’s first quarter .. and its impact beyond Toronto

Mar 7th, 2011 | By | Category: In Brief

[UPDATE:  For the ALLEGED ROB FORD CRACK SMOKING SCANDAL, late May 2013, see “Streetcar Named Rob Ford lives on .. remember when his worship said he ‘no longer uses marijuana’ in 2010 ????.” ] At long last, the several hands who have been working since late December on what has now become our first quarterly […]



The Canadian federal election of 2011 : was Diefenbaker right about polls?

Mar 4th, 2011 | By | Category: Ottawa Scene

[UPDATED MARCH 7, 9, 11, 16, 25, 30, APRIL 5, 8, 11, 13, 22, MAY 1, 3]. Le Devoir, in the most politically sophisticated region of  Canada’s wonderland, may have already pronounced the simplest truth (or dare) on the Canadian federal election of 2011: “Flaherty ferme la porte au compromis sur le budget … Le […]



NDP (and Liberals) could support Harper’s Bill S-8 on Senate elections, in exchange for provincial representation concept that makes sense for Quebec

Mar 2nd, 2011 | By | Category: In Brief

Flipping through the rather slender electronic file on the federal NDP motion for “a national referendum on abolishing the Senate” — slated for debate in the Canadian House of Commons today, after some procedural wrangling yesterday — forces you to dwell on just how beleaguered the cause of progress in Ottawa has become lately. The […]